History

Is This The Best Cover of A-ha's "Take On Me" Of All Time?

yqfzmssvewtclu8smwuy (1).png

Is this the best cover of A-ha's "Take On Me" of all time? That depends on how many covers of it you've heard. We're big fans of covers, at least co-founder Alex Roy is, so we've done the heavy lifting for you and found some more of them, ranging from jazzy to metal.

Let's start with the original 80's classic:

Then we've got this fun acoustic version by Seven Handle Circus from New Orleans:

And then you have this which could almost be by Fishbone, but is by another band with "fish" in it, Reel Big Fish:

How about a very 80's-style metal cover by a very Nordic metal band called Northern Kings?

If that soft metal cover wasn't metal enough for you, here's a speed metal version from Triphon. Starts heavier than it ends:

Sadly for the cover bands, it seems that the best cover us actually the acoustic version by the original A-ha for MTV unplugged. Yes, we know it's not really a cover, but it's certainly the loveliest version:

Is Reel-to-Reel the New Vinyl?

teac-16-960x1024.jpg

Is reel-to-reel the new vinyl? We don't carry new reel-to-reel hardware, but we've fielded a few calls asking if we did. So we did some digging around what appears to be a growing trend, and came across this recent article in The Robb Report, "The Most Expensive Music of Today Is Recorded on Mediums from the Past," suggesting that reel-to-reel is making a comeback:

"It turns out the audiophiles were right. Despite decades of pundits predicting its demise, analog audio has made a big comeback in recent years, with vinyl records, reel-to-reel tapes, and even cassette tapes gaining interest in the mass market. At the high end, this has led to more interest in limited physical album releases—often produced with painstaking care using esoteric methods—and high price tags. Enthusiasts are spending hundreds on single albums in pursuit of sonic perfection and the chance to own something truly special.

One of the primary drivers behind this is sound quality. Despite vinyl’s imperfections, many discerning listeners prefer the warmth, presence, and emotion communicated through a record—qualities that are simply missing from digital reproduction. In some cases, however, it can be challenging to collect recordings of vintage performances in good condition, so some modern vinyl reissues are mastered from inferior digital sources rather than the analog master tape."

Read the rest of the story and tell us what you think...